Archive

Upcoming Events

The CCIJ Toronto Working Group and Amnesty International will be co-hosting a screening of No Fire Zone, followed by a panel discussion at the Carlton Cinema, 20 Carlton Street on Sunday, November 17th at 4:30 p.m.

No Fire Zone is the definitive story of the final awful months of the 26 year-long Sri Lankan civil war told by the people who lived through it. While the world looked away around 40,000 to 70,000 civilians were massacred – mostly by Sri Lankan government shelling, though the Tamil Tigers also stand accused of war crimes.

A chilling expose of some of the worst war crimes and crimes against humanity of recent times – told through the extraordinary personal stories of a small group of characters and also through some of the most dramatic and disturbing video evidence ever recorded. Footage which documents the day to day horror of this war in a way almost never done before: footage recorded by both the victims and perpetrators on mobile phones and small cameras – viscerally powerful actuality from the battlefield, from inside the crudely dug bunkers and over-crowded makeshift hospitals.

Speakers include:

  • Craig Brannagan, a Toronto-based criminal defence lawyer, and a Member of the CCIJ Case Team that is seeking justice for a Tamil-Canadian before the UN Human Rights Committee for alleged international human rights violations that he suffered at the hands of Sri Lankan State officials.
  • Arjuna Ranawana, a Sri Lankan immigrant to Canada, who is an experienced journalist, both in Canada, and in his native Sri Lanka.  As News Manager for OMNI TV, he has succeeded in leading a diversified team of producers and directors in producing newscasts in Mandarin, Cantonese and English for a South Asian audience, especially in Alberta.  In Sri Lanka,  Arjuna had various roles, both editing newspapers and reporting for them.

This film is part of the Amnesty International Toronto Human Rights Film Festival running from November 14th to 17th. The REEL AWARENESS Film Festival showcases some of the best human rights documentaries and feature films shown around the world. This must-see collection of films is both inspirational and informative. Join Amnesty International in protecting and promoting human rights!

For more information or to purchase tickets to No Fire Zone or other REEL AWARENESS film screenings visit AITO.

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Philippe Kirsch Institute Logo

 

 

 

 

 

This is the first CPD session offered by the Philippe Kirsch Institute, a new social enterprise offering specialized professional development of the highest calibre & value delivered by a who’s who of subject experts. This is CPD with a conscience.

November 21, 2013, 4:00pm
Osgoode Hall, 130 Queen St. W.
In partnership with the Law Society of Upper Canada

* accredited by the LSUC for 0.5 professionalism hours and 2.25 substantive hours

Delivering this session is Judge Philippe Kirsch — former judge & first president of the International Criminal Court — along with the Honourable Ian Binnie, former Puisne Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada, Raj Anand, Partner at WeirFoulds, and Tina Lie, Partner at Paliare Roland. A reception will follow at 7pm.

Register for this session (digital participation is also available)

To attend the reception only, please RSVP here.

Thanks to our sponsor, Eventstream.

The CCIJ Toronto Working Group and Amnesty International will be co-hosting a screening of No Fire Zone, followed by a panel discussion at the Carlton Cinema, 20 Carlton Street on Sunday, November 17th.

No Fire Zone is the definitive story of the final awful months of the 26 year-long Sri Lankan civil war told by the people who lived through it. While the world looked away around 40,000 to 70,000 civilians were massacred – mostly by Sri Lankan government shelling, though the Tamil Tigers also stand accused of war crimes.

A chilling expose of some of the worst war crimes and crimes against humanity of recent times – told through the extraordinary personal stories of a small group of characters and also through some of the most dramatic and disturbing video evidence ever recorded. Footage which documents the day to day horror of this war in a way almost never done before: footage recorded by both the victims and perpetrators on mobile phones and small cameras – viscerally powerful actuality from the battlefield, from inside the crudely dug bunkers and over-crowded makeshift hospitals.

This film is part of the Amnesty International Toronto Human Rights Film Festival running from November 14th to 17th. The REEL AWARENESS Film Festival showcases some of the best human rights documentaries and feature films shown around the world. This must-see collection of films is both inspirational and informative. Join Amnesty International in protecting and promoting human rights!

No Fire Zone

To read more about the film or to view the trailer, click here.

For more information or to purchase tickets to No Fire Zone or other REEL AWARENESS film screenings visit AITO.

We will be holding the next meeting of the Toronto Working Group at Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture, 194 Jarvis Street, 2nd Floor (just south of Dundas) from 6 – 8 pm this coming Tuesday, February 12th.

We will be discussing CCIJ TWG plans for 2013. All working group members or interested partners are welcome. If you cannot attend the meeting and have any suggestions for undertakings in 2013, please email us at toronto@ccij.ca.

Hope to see you Tuesday!

Joanne Preece
Operational Manager
Toronto Working Group

We are pleased to announce the following panelists for our January 24th screening of Granito:

• Omar Cano, Guatemalan journalist, President of ASOGUATE (Guatemalan Canadian Association).

Professor Carlota McAllister, Department of Anthropology, York University whose research focuses on the formation of political and moral agency in situations of violent conflict, particularly Guatemala.

Caren Weisbart, 2011 winner of CERLAC’s Baptista prize for her analysis of contemporary political economy and cultural politics in Guatemala.

Join us for this story of destinies joined by Guatemala’s past, and how a documentary film about a nation’s turbulent history emerges as an active player in the present offering evidence to put Efrain Rios Mont, former General and Guatemalan President, on trial for genocide.
York University
Room 1014
Osgoode Hall Law School
Ignat Kaneff Building
4700 Keele Street

January 10 – University of Toronto Faculty of Law, International Human Rights Program Constitutional Roundtable presents:

Jeff King, Senior Lecturer, Faculty of Laws, University College, London

Judging Social Rights

Thursday, January 10 , 2013 – 12:30 – 2:00 (A light lunch will be served.)
University of Toronto, Faculty of Law
Flavelle House, 78 Queen’s Park, Room FLC

Jeff King is a distinguished visitor this year at the Faculty of Law, teaching an intensive course on social rights. His discussion will focus on some of the central themes of his book, Judging Social Rights (Cambridge Studies in Constitutional Law).  His book offers an extended argument about why abstract social rights to housing, education, health care, and social security should be part of constitutions.  He argues that judges should be able to interpret and enforce social rights, including by striking down legislation, but should act incrementally, taking small steps to expand the coverage of existing rules and principles in a controlled fashion.

Jeff King, BA Hons in Phil (Ottawa) 1996, LLB/BCL (McGill) 2002, MSt (Oxford) 2006, DPhil (Oxford) 2009, is a Senior Lecturer at the Faculty of Laws University College London, where he teaches public law, human rights, and legal and constitutional theory. He is Co-Editor of the journal Current Legal Problems. Previously, he was a Fellow and Tutor in law at Balliol College, and CUF Lecturer for the Faculty of Law, University of Oxford (2008-2011), a Research Fellow at the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies, Oxford (2008-2010), a Research Fellow and Tutor in public law at Keble College, Oxford (2007-08), and an attorney at Sullivan & Cromwell LLP in New York City (2003-04). His research and teaching broadly examines doctrinal, theoretical and empirical aspects of comparative public law. He has published articles on the justiciability of resource allocation, judicial restraint, complexity in adjudication, the function of constitutions, the value of legal accountability, proportionality in administrative law, odious debt in international law, and a monograph setting out the case for constitutional social rights and a theory of adjudication in respect of them.

PLEASE REGISTER HERE

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January 15 – University of Toronto Faculty of Law, International Human Rights Program and The Muslim Law Students Association present: Challenging America’s Targeted Killings Program in U.S. Courts: Al-Aulaqi v. Panetta 

Tuesday, January 15, 2013 – 12:30 – 2:00p.m. (Lunch will be served.)
University of Toronto, Faculty of Law
Flavelle House, 78 Queen’s Park, Flavelle Classroom A: FLA (Basement)

Speaker: Jameel Jaffer,  Director, Centre for Democracy, American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU)

Routinely since 2009, the U.S. has carried out deliberate and premeditated killings of suspected terrorists overseas. In Al-Aulaqi v. Panetta, the ACLU and the Center for Constitutional Rights (CCR) allege that the U.S. government’s killings of three American citizens in Yemen last year violated domestic and international law. This case follows an unsuccessful suit filed by the ACLU and CCR in 2010 (Al-Aulaqi v. Obama) challenging Anwar Al-Aulaqi’s placement on the government kill list.

Jameel Jaffer, originally from Toronto, directed the ACLU’s National Security Project from 2007-2010 and is currently the Director of the ACLU’s Center for Democracy. Since 2004, has served as a human rights monitor for the military commissions at Guantánamo. His book, Administration of Torture, was published by Columbia University Press in 2007. Prior to joining the ACLU, he clerked for Amalya L. Kearse, U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit, and Rt. Hon. Beverley McLachlin, Chief Justice of Canada. He is a graduate of Williams College, Cambridge University, and Harvard Law School.

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February 8 – Conference: Sexual Violence in the Recent Conflicts in Libya and Syria: Challenges to Protecting Victims and Pursuing Accountability

Featuring human rights defenders, leading academics, international lawyers, and policy makers from
the region and around the world. View draft list of presenters here.

University of Toronto Faculty of Law, International Human Rights Program and the Munk School of Global Affairs.

Friday, February 8, 2013 – 8:30 am – 6:00 pm
University of Toronto, Faculty of Law
Bennett Lecture Hall, 78 Queen’s Park Crescent, Basement

Free and open to the public. Registration opens January 7: http://munkschool.utoronto.ca/events/

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February 21 – Reflections on Current Challenges Facing the ICC

University of Toronto Faculty of Law, International Human Rights Program presents: James K. Stewart (LL.B. ’75) Deputy Prosecutor, International Criminal Court (ICC)

February 21, 2013 – 5:30 – 7:00 p.m.
University of Toronto, Faculty of Law
Falconer Hall, 84 Queen’s Park, Solarium

Just days prior to commencing his post as Deputy Prosecutor of the ICC, James Stewart (LL.B. 1975) will return to the Faculty to reflect on current challenges facing the International Criminal Court. This will be an intimate event featuring an alumnus of the Faculty poised to take on one of the most prominent roles in the field of international justice. On 16 November 2012, Stewart was elected Deputy Prosecutor of the ICC by the Assembly of States Parties to the Rome Statute; he will commence his post on March 8, 2013. Prior to joining the Office of the Prosecutor (OTP) of the ICC, Stewart worked as General Counsel in the Crown Law Office within the Ministry of the Attorney General, in Toronto. He joined the Downtown Toronto Crown Attorney’s Office as an Assistant Crown Attorney in 1979, handling criminal trials at all levels of court. Since 1985, Stewart has served in the Crown Law Office – Criminal, where his practice expanded to include appeals before the Court of Appeal for Ontario and the Supreme Court of Canada. On leaves of absence from his office, he worked at the UN international criminal tribunals, serving as Senior Trial Attorney in the OTP at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR); as Chief of Prosecutions in the OTP at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY); and as Senior Appeals Counsel and then Chief of the Appeals and Legal Advisory Division in the OTP at the ICTR.